4-H TEENS RECOGNIZED for ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Friday, January 19th was a night of excitement, friendship, and good times when the 4-H teens of Delaware County, who submitted completed 4-H Member Record Books, came together to be recognized for all of their accomplishments during the 2016-17 4-H year.

Members and their families shared a dinner together which was provided by Delaware County 4-H, followed by an awards ceremony.

Extension 4-H Resource Educator, Emily Roach, welcomed the teens and their families and offered a few thoughts on the past year. Emily went on to talk to the teens about not being afraid to take chances and ended by telling them to “keep your heads up, make good choices, and ‘don’t worry about failures, worry about the chances you miss when you don’t even try.”

Michael Steele, 4-H Program Issue Committee Chairman and 4-H representative on the CCE of Delaware County Board of Directors handed out certificates and awards to the teens. Also in attendance were 4-H Issue Committee members: Jill Coleman, Donna Machala and Amanda Madugno and our 4-H Teen Representatives: Jessica Coleman and George Machala.

After the awards ceremony, everyone took time to catch-up before heading for home.

Thank you to Mike Steele and the 4-H Issue Committee for taking the time to attend and help to honor our 4-H youth at this year’s 4-H Teen Recognition Night event.

 

Results for 4-H Teen County Champion Awards:

MIKALA ANDERSON, Deposit – Del-Bros Member

AGRICULTURE – BEEF – POULTRY – PUBLIC SPEAKING – SWINE

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BRYNNE BACKUS, Sidney Center – Kountry Kids & Kritters Member

AGRICULTURE – GOATS – GARDENING & HORTICULTURE

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MATT COX, Franklin –Independent Member

CLOTHING & TEXTILES – COOKING

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NATE DENNIS, Treadwell –Independent Member

CLOTHING & TEXTILES – GARDENING & HORTICULTURE – VISUAL ARTS

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GRACE DUNHAM, Summit –Colorful Clovers Member

AGRICULTURE – DAIRY – PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEO

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RAINE HOWE, Walton –Country Bumpkins & Eye of the Clover Member

AGRICULTURE – CHILDCARE DEVELOPMENT – POULTRY – WOOD SCIENCE

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CAEL HOWLAND, Franklin –TRAEL Pets Member

AGRICULTURE – BEEF – DOGS – PUBLIC SPEAKING – SWINE – VETERINARY SCIENCE

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TRACER HOWLAND, Franklin –TRAEL Pets Member

AGRICULTURE – BEEF – DOGS – ENGINES/TRACTORS/FIELD EQUIPMENT – PUBLIC SPEAKING – SWINE – VETERINARY SCIENCE

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GEORGE MACHALA, Franklin – Little Clovers Member

AEROSPACE – COOKING – FASHION REVUE – GOATS – HOBBIES & COLLECTIONS –

HOME ENVIRONMENT – PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEO – PUBLIC SPEAKING – VISUAL ARTS

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AUTUMN MADUGNO, Deposit –Del-Bros Member

AGRICULTURE – CONSUMER & FAMILY SCIENCES – DAIRY – FOOD & NUTRITION – GOATS – GARDENING & HORTICULTURE – POULTRY – HOME ENVIRONMENT – PUBLIC SPEAKING – SWINE

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ALEXIS PERNICE, Hamden – Thundering Hooves Member

AGRICULTURE – HORSE

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MIKAYLA PERNICE, Hamden –Thundering Hooves Member

HORSE – POULTRY – SWINE

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JACOB POMEROY, Walton –Independent Member

OUTDOOR EDUCATION & RECREATION – WOOD SCIENCE

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LINDSEY WRIGHT, Delancey –Independent Member

CLOTHING & TEXTILES – DOGS – FASHION REVUE – GOATS – PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEO – RABBITS – SWINE – VISUAL ARTS

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GREGORY ZUILL, Davenport –Backyard Critters Member

AGRICULTURE – CAVY – RABBITS – SHEEP

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RYAN ZUILL, Davenport –Backyard Critters Member

POULTRY – VISUAL ARTS

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ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Nate Dennis, Treadwell – Independent Member

Raina Howe, Walton – Country Bumpkins & Eye of the Clover Member

Cael Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

Tracer Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

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CITIZENSHIP AWARD

Ryan Zuill, Davenport – Backyard Critters Member

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COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARD

George Machala, Franklin – Little Clovers Member

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LEADERSHIP AWARD

Cael Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

Tracer Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

George Machala, Franklin – Little Clovers Member

Autumn Madugno, Deposit – Del-Bros Member

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4-H TEEN TRIP WINNERS

AGRI-BUSINESS CAREER TRIP to Cobleskill and the Albany area

Awarded to teens who may be interested in a career in Agri-Business.

Winners

Raina Howe, Walton – Country Bumpkins & Eye of the Clover Member

Tracer Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

Alexis Pernice, Hamden – Thundering Hooves Member

Jacob Pomeroy, Walton – Independent Member

Alternate

Mikayla Anderson, Deposit – Del-Bros Member

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STATE TEEN ACTION REPRESENTATIVES RETREAT (STARR)

The STARR Program is a three day, fun-filled event held at the New York State Fairgrounds in Syracuse, where 4-H teens participate in a variety of workshops and activities meant to challenge, excite, and further develop life skills.

Winners

Mikayla Anderson, Deposit – Del-Bros Member

Nate Dennis, Treadwell – Independent Member

Raina Howe, Walton – Country Bumpkins & Eye of the Clover Member

Alexis Pernice, Hamden – Thundering Hooves Member

Mikayla Pernice, Hamden – Thundering Hooves Member

Gregory Zuill, Davenport – Backyard Critters Member

Alternates

George Machala, Franklin – Little Clovers Member

Tracer Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

Jacob Pomeroy, Walton – Independent Member

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4-H CAPITAL DAYS TRIP to Albany

Awarded on the basis of citizenship, leadership, ability and overall achievement. The participants in this program spend two days with 4-Hers from every county in New York State meeting with senators and assemblymen, touring the Capitol, Legislative Office Building, and State Museum.

Winners

George Machala, Franklin – Little Clovers Member

Tracer Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

Alternates

Nate Dennis, Treadwell – Independent Member

Jacob Pomeroy, Walton – Independent Member

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4-H CAREER EXPLORATION TRIP to Cornell

An opportunity for youth to explore the resources of Cornell University. The three days are a chance to learn about science and technology, check out college life, and develop leadership skills through one of several special programs.

Winners

Mikayla Anderson, Deposit – Del-Bros Member

Brynne Backus, Sidney Center – Kountry Kids & Kritters Member

Matt Cox, Franklin – Independent Member

Grace Dunham, Summit – Colorful Clovers Member

Autumn Madugno, Deposit – Del-Bros Member

Cael Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

Alternates

1st Alternate: Jacob Pomeroy, Walton – Independent Member

Nate Dennis, Treadwell – Independent Member

Tracer Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

George Machala, Franklin – Little Clovers Member

Lindsey Wright, Delancey – Independent Member

Ryan Zuill, Davenport – Backyard Critters

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HONOR AWARD TRIP to NEW YORK CITY

A cultural trip and selection is based on accomplishment and achievements in 4-H.

Winners

George Machala, Franklin – Little Clovers Member

Alexis Pernice, Hamden – Thundering Hooves Member

Mikayla Pernice, Hamden – Thundering Hooves Member

Jacob Pomeroy, Walton – Independent Member

Alternate

Matt Cox, Treadwell – Independent Member

Tracer Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

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CAREER EXPLORATION TRIP to Vermont

A trip where teens will explore careers and participate in cultural experiences.

Winners

Mikayla Anderson, Deposit – Del-Bros Member

Tracer Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

Alternate

Nate Dennis, Treadwell – Independent Member

George Machala, Franklin – Little Clovers Member

Festive Holiday Kissing Balls

Kissing balls add warmth and beauty indoors and out.  On December 2nd, CCE Delaware county hosted not one but two workshops on kissing ball creation.  Using freshly sourced local greenery, over 40 participants made gorgeous kissing balls for their homes and loved ones.  Our primary material was Norway spruce, which is abundant around here.  Once a framework was established, bits of blue spruce, pine needle clusters, and Rhododendron leaves were added.  Pine cones were added for the finishing touch.

Couldn’t make it to the workshop, but want to make a kissing ball? You can download full instructions by clicking here!

 

Packed House!

 

Executive Director Jeanne Darling demonstrates the insertion of greens into foam.

 

Works of art in progress!

 

Ta-da!  Our youngest participant shows off her gorgeous creation.

Making maple in Delaware County

Although we associate maple syrup production with the cold winter days of early spring, a great deal of education and planning takes place in the fall.

On October 21st, CCE Delaware hosted a beginning maple syrup production workshop that was sponsored by the Watershed Agriculture Council.  The workshop was led by Stephen Childs, the New York State Maple Specialist at Cornell University.  He covered a variety of aspects of maple syrup production including: why make maple syrup, tree identification, tree health, tapping, sap collection and handling, boiling, energy efficiency, finishing and grading syrup, canning, marketing and regulations.  Participants included hobbyists who had already tapped a few trees and wanted to improve quality/efficiency and landowners looking to try making syrup for the first time.

After a very informative classroom session, we visited Brookside Maple and Farm, a nearby operation that has grown by leaps and bounds over the last few years.  Brothers Matt and Micah Scobie started making syrup as as kids, and continued to add taps and increase production during their school years.  Now that they have graduated and have full-time jobs, they have actually scaled up, but are using technology to make the process more efficient.  They are using reverse osmosis to concentrate the sap prior to boiling (saves time + energy) and have invested in a large-scale oil fired evaporator.

Delaware County Maple Producers are a very knowledgeable, helpful group willing to share ideas, advice and resources.  Several members met here at the CCE office in Hamden on September 26th, and plan to meet again on November 16th at 7 p.m.  Christine Reimer from Mountain Lady Maple will discuss organic maple production, her novel packaging, and bar codes.  For more information, call the office at 607-865-6531 or email [email protected] .

 

Leaves out!

The peak of fall is behind us in Delaware County.  We were lucky to get a brief, beautiful showing Columbus day weekend, but now the hills taking on the muted tones of winter.  What happened?

We began seeing leaf drop before the fair, and signs of distress even earlier in the summer.  The cool, wet summer caused a proliferation of fungal diseases, which impacted numerous tree species.  The hardest hit by far in our county…apples.  I fielded apple calls just about every day in August and September.  It started as spots on leaves and fruit, and escalated into totally bare trees.  Some were loaded with fruit, some had no fruit, but a major theme was leaf drop.  The major culprit – apple scab disease.  This common disease affects most apples and crabapples that aren’t treated on a yearly basis, but it usually isn’t problematic.  A spot here or there doesn’t really take away from the beauty of the tree, and the apples are still tasty for humans and wildlife.

This year, the trees decided to cut their losses, and dropped their leaves. Some varieties pumped their surplus resources into fruit production, which resulted in early ripening.  Other varieties dropped their apples before they even had a chance to ripen.

Maples, our leaf-color superheros, were also affected by the damp conditions.  Tar spot, another common fungal pathogen, hit the maples hard and early this year.  Like the apples, the leaves just fell off the tree without any noteworthy color change.  Luckily, not all varieties are sensitive, and we did see some gorgeous oranges, yellows, and reds.

Delaware County is not alone.  There have been reports of early leaf drop across the Southern Tier and into the Finger Lakes.

Now here is the GOOD NEWS…the trees should be just fine as long as we don’t have multiple back-to-back years like this one.  The absolute best thing you can do this year is to rake up and dispose of your leaves.  I’m usually adamant about mulching and composting leaves, but the sick leaves need to go.  If you live in a village, put them out for curbside pickup.  In the country, either relocate the leaves to an un-used part of the property to decay naturally, or speed up the process in place by mowing over the leaves.  You can also add a dilute solution of urea as described in this article.

For next year, consider treating important ornamentals and small fruit trees with a fungicide in the early winter/late spring (see this publication for more information).

Beef Quality Assurance Training A Success

Dr. Mike Baker, State Beef Specialist with Cornell University, provided training on Beef Quality Assurance, a program sponsored by the New York Beef Council to train beef producers on management practices that impact beef food safety and consumer confidence in beef. Mike and the accompanying vets led the group on a drug label reading exercize where each participant was given a drug bottle or box to read and answer questions regarding the label. Finally, a chute-side training allowed each participant to demonstrate a successful sub-cutaneous injection. Ron Cieri and Jim Ingram also explained their cattle handling system. Participants are now eligible to complete a form and gain level one certification in Beef Quality Assurance.

New Nutrition Facts Labels To Feature Added Sugars With Daily Value

A line disclosing added sugars with a corresponding percent Daily Value on updated Nutrition Facts labels should help consumers reduce their risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.

The new Daily Value for added sugars on the revised labels will be 50 grams, or about 12 teaspoons—an amount representing 10 percent of the daily 2,000 calories recommended for many adults. Once the rules are implemented, the Nutrition Facts label on a 20-ounce bottle of Coke, for example, would likely show that it had 130 percent of the added sugars limit for a day. The new labels will help consumers looking at labels for things like yogurt, jams, or cereals know how much of the sugar comes from fruit or milk, and how much comes from high-fructose corn syrup or other added sugars.

Right now, it’s impossible for consumers who look at a Nutrition Facts label to know how much of the sugar in foods is added and how that amount fits into a reasonable daily diet. Besides helping consumers make more informed choices, the new labels should also spur food manufacturers to add less sugar to their products.

The revision announced today represents the first comprehensive overhaul of the Nutrition Facts label since its appearance on packaged foods in 1994 as a result of the passage of the 1990 Nutrition Labeling and Education Act. Besides spearheading efforts to pass the NLEA, CSPI also petitioned the FDA to make the only other change to the labels since its inception —a line for trans fat that became mandatory in 2006. When the FDA first proposed revising Nutrition Facts labels in 2014, the proposal included a line—but no Daily Value—for added sugars. In comments on the proposed rule in August of 2014, CSPI argued that without a percent DV, consumers wouldn’t know how much of a day’s worth of added sugars a serving of a food contained. In July of 2015 the FDA proposed a Daily Value for added sugars.

The new Nutrition Facts labels also give more visual emphasis to calories and will no longer have a reference to “calories from fat,” reflecting the new understanding that saturated and trans fat increase the risk of heart disease, while polyunsaturated fats and oils can reduce that risk. The labels will make voluntary the declarations for vitamins A and C, of which most Americans get plenty, but declarations for potassium and vitamin D will be required. The new rule lowers the Daily Value for sodium slightly, from 2,400 mg per day to 2,300 mg per day (CSPI would have preferred a more protective Daily Value of 1,500 mg per day).

The FDA also adjusted some serving sizes to reflect amounts typically consumed. Thus, the serving size of ice cream will be two-thirds of a cup instead of half a cup and labels will show proportionately increased calories, saturated fat, added sugars, and so on. The serving size for soft drinks will increase from eight ounces to 12 ounces. The serving size for bagels, toaster pastries, and muffins (except English muffins) will increase from two to four ounces. And single-serving packages of foods that weigh up to (but not quite) twice the standard serving size will be considered just one serving. Hence, a 20-oz. bottle of soda will have to be labeled as one serving.

Center for Science in the Public Interest, May 20, 2016

True Armyworm Alert

True Armyworm infestations have been reported this week in eastern and western NY, as mentioned in the View from the Field. GET OUT AND LOOK NOW!

It is important to detect armyworm areas early, while larvae are still small, since large larvae do most of the feeding and quickly destroy whole stands of corn, grasses and small grains. Because armyworm feeds at night look for chewed leaves, cut stems, lodged plants, pellet-like frass on the ground, and larvae hidden under plant canopy and surface residue. You will need to be aware that armyworms can move from field to field every quickly. If there are sufficient numbers and damage is present, an insecticide could be justified. Larger armyworm larvae, greater than 1 inch long, are much more difficult to control. These large larvae are more tolerant of insecticides, reducing the effectiveness and economic viability of this option. REMEMBER… if you have an infestation in a mixed stand true armyworm, alfalfa and the grass ALL NEED to be on the LABEL!!!

True armyworm larvae appear smooth cylindrical pale green too brownish when they are still small. Mature larvae are smooth and marked with two orange, white-bordered strips on each side. True armyworm ranges in size from 1/8 inch to 1 .5 inches long.

Economic Threshold Guidelines for True Armyworm 

Corn – For seedling stage corn Penn State recommends For whorl-stagecorn, apply an insecticide only if most plants show damage and about three larvae per plant are found.

Wheat – 3 to 5 or more larvae square foot, larvae less than 1.25 inches and not parasitized, watch for flag leaf reduction or if grain heads clipped off – yield losses, a spray before soft dough to save the remaining 3 upper leaves is generally beneficial since these tissues are still important to grain filling.

Grasses – no specific guidelines available, need for treatment based on the level of damage observed in relation to the expected value of grass harvest.

Identification Resources:

Armyworm as a pest of Field Corn:

http://ento.psu.edu/extension/factsheets/armyworm Armyworm on Wheat: http://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/ENT-36 Common (True) Armyworm: http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/IPM/english/sweet-corn/insects/common-armyworm.html Fall Armyworm: http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/IPM/english/sweet-corn/insects/fall-armyworm.html