Fun with Colors Quilting Workshop on April 25, 2018

Step outside the box and create a colorful quilt using bright fabrics!  Expert quilter Polly DellaCrosse will guide you through the process from start to finish during this all day workshop at St. John’s Episcopal Church in Delhi on Wednesday, April 25, 2018.

You will need to bring:

  • Sewing machine (let us know if you need to borrow one)
  • A variety of Fat Quarters that are color coordinated (minimum 10)
  • Coordinated backing fabric (1-1/2 yards)
  • Coordinated fabric (1 yard)
  • Small package of batting (45″ x 60″)
  • Coordinated thread
  • Embellishments (buttons, ribbons, use your imagination)

Finished projects can be displayed at the Delaware County Fair this summer!  Bring a dish to pass to share for potluck lunch.

Date:        Wednesday, April 25, 2018
Time:       9:00 am – 3:00 pm
Place:       St. John’s Episcopal Church, 134 Main St., Delhi, NY
Fee:          $5 suggested donation
Register:  Contact Cornell Cooperative Extension of Delaware County at 607-865-6531 or [email protected]

GO Delaware County Beef Producers

Sheep and Goat International Night

CCE Educator Rich Toebe in collaboration with Dan Flaherty invited guests to participate in an evening of comradery and sharing during the Sheep and Goat International Night held on February 21st 2018 at Cornell Cooperative Extension Delaware County in Hamden.

Participants shared in food representative of these regions prepared by the speakers, and several shared their own experiences.  Sonja Hedlund shared her experiences at the 2010 Terra Madre as well as her visits to sheep and goat farms and cheesemakers in France, Georgia, and Italy.  Gayle Brown provided information on sheep and goat production in the Graubunden region of Switzerland.  Dan Flaherty shared his experiences helping sheep and goat farmers in Kyrgyzstan.  Kim Cassano translated and shared a video of a shepherd in Rost, part of an Island archipelago in outer Lofoten, Norway.

We hope to see you at the next event.

Drug-Take Back Program Launches at 5 New York Hospitals

Young farmers share their stories

Workshop offers insight on understanding heifer growth and performance based on local data

presenter addressing group

Rich Toebe summarized his results from measuring over 2000 heifers in Delaware County for a crowd of just over forty people last Thursday for the Understanding your Heifer’s Growth and Performance program hosted at the Delhi Fire Hall on February 1st.  He identified the most common challenges being faced by Delaware County farms.  Participants were able to follow along with their farm’s growth charts.

Mike Van Amburgh of Cornell Department of Animal Science identified the most common disrupters of heifer raising systems on dairy farms.  He covered nutrition at various stages, benchmarks to achieve to meet the physiological needs of the cow as well as financial performance of the business; and the real costs of calving in undersized, including the impact on milk production.

Julio Giordano, Asst. Professor at Cornell for Dairy Cattle Biology and Management, provided a refresher on heifer reproductive physiology and shared the most common challenges to a successful heifer reproductive program.  He then shared various breeding protocols that result in calving at an earlier age specific to the type of challenge the farm is facing.   

Rob Lynch of Cornell Pro Dairy finished the program speaking about management strategies that maximize heifer performance and revenue.   Mike broke the heifer growth period into three:  pre-weaned calves, post weaned calves, and the reproductive stage.  He then covered nutritional and breeding strategies to optimize performance and economic return in each of these three stages.

~ This event was sponsored by Cornell Cooperative Extension Delaware County and the Watershed Agricultural Council 

4-H TEENS RECOGNIZED for ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Friday, January 19th was a night of excitement, friendship, and good times when the 4-H teens of Delaware County, who submitted completed 4-H Member Record Books, came together to be recognized for all of their accomplishments during the 2016-17 4-H year.

Members and their families shared a dinner together which was provided by Delaware County 4-H, followed by an awards ceremony.

Extension 4-H Resource Educator, Emily Roach, welcomed the teens and their families and offered a few thoughts on the past year. Emily went on to talk to the teens about not being afraid to take chances and ended by telling them to “keep your heads up, make good choices, and ‘don’t worry about failures, worry about the chances you miss when you don’t even try.”

Michael Steele, 4-H Program Issue Committee Chairman and 4-H representative on the CCE of Delaware County Board of Directors handed out certificates and awards to the teens. Also in attendance were 4-H Issue Committee members: Jill Coleman, Donna Machala and Amanda Madugno and our 4-H Teen Representatives: Jessica Coleman and George Machala.

After the awards ceremony, everyone took time to catch-up before heading for home.

Thank you to Mike Steele and the 4-H Issue Committee for taking the time to attend and help to honor our 4-H youth at this year’s 4-H Teen Recognition Night event.

 

Results for 4-H Teen County Champion Awards:

MIKALA ANDERSON, Deposit – Del-Bros Member

AGRICULTURE – BEEF – POULTRY – PUBLIC SPEAKING – SWINE

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BRYNNE BACKUS, Sidney Center – Kountry Kids & Kritters Member

AGRICULTURE – GOATS – GARDENING & HORTICULTURE

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MATT COX, Franklin –Independent Member

CLOTHING & TEXTILES – COOKING

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NATE DENNIS, Treadwell –Independent Member

CLOTHING & TEXTILES – GARDENING & HORTICULTURE – VISUAL ARTS

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GRACE DUNHAM, Summit –Colorful Clovers Member

AGRICULTURE – DAIRY – PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEO

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RAINE HOWE, Walton –Country Bumpkins & Eye of the Clover Member

AGRICULTURE – CHILDCARE DEVELOPMENT – POULTRY – WOOD SCIENCE

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CAEL HOWLAND, Franklin –TRAEL Pets Member

AGRICULTURE – BEEF – DOGS – PUBLIC SPEAKING – SWINE – VETERINARY SCIENCE

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TRACER HOWLAND, Franklin –TRAEL Pets Member

AGRICULTURE – BEEF – DOGS – ENGINES/TRACTORS/FIELD EQUIPMENT – PUBLIC SPEAKING – SWINE – VETERINARY SCIENCE

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GEORGE MACHALA, Franklin – Little Clovers Member

AEROSPACE – COOKING – FASHION REVUE – GOATS – HOBBIES & COLLECTIONS –

HOME ENVIRONMENT – PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEO – PUBLIC SPEAKING – VISUAL ARTS

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AUTUMN MADUGNO, Deposit –Del-Bros Member

AGRICULTURE – CONSUMER & FAMILY SCIENCES – DAIRY – FOOD & NUTRITION – GOATS – GARDENING & HORTICULTURE – POULTRY – HOME ENVIRONMENT – PUBLIC SPEAKING – SWINE

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ALEXIS PERNICE, Hamden – Thundering Hooves Member

AGRICULTURE – HORSE

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MIKAYLA PERNICE, Hamden –Thundering Hooves Member

HORSE – POULTRY – SWINE

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JACOB POMEROY, Walton –Independent Member

OUTDOOR EDUCATION & RECREATION – WOOD SCIENCE

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LINDSEY WRIGHT, Delancey –Independent Member

CLOTHING & TEXTILES – DOGS – FASHION REVUE – GOATS – PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEO – RABBITS – SWINE – VISUAL ARTS

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GREGORY ZUILL, Davenport –Backyard Critters Member

AGRICULTURE – CAVY – RABBITS – SHEEP

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RYAN ZUILL, Davenport –Backyard Critters Member

POULTRY – VISUAL ARTS

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ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Nate Dennis, Treadwell – Independent Member

Raina Howe, Walton – Country Bumpkins & Eye of the Clover Member

Cael Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

Tracer Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

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CITIZENSHIP AWARD

Ryan Zuill, Davenport – Backyard Critters Member

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COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARD

George Machala, Franklin – Little Clovers Member

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LEADERSHIP AWARD

Cael Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

Tracer Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

George Machala, Franklin – Little Clovers Member

Autumn Madugno, Deposit – Del-Bros Member

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4-H TEEN TRIP WINNERS

AGRI-BUSINESS CAREER TRIP to Cobleskill and the Albany area

Awarded to teens who may be interested in a career in Agri-Business.

Winners

Raina Howe, Walton – Country Bumpkins & Eye of the Clover Member

Tracer Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

Alexis Pernice, Hamden – Thundering Hooves Member

Jacob Pomeroy, Walton – Independent Member

Alternate

Mikayla Anderson, Deposit – Del-Bros Member

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STATE TEEN ACTION REPRESENTATIVES RETREAT (STARR)

The STARR Program is a three day, fun-filled event held at the New York State Fairgrounds in Syracuse, where 4-H teens participate in a variety of workshops and activities meant to challenge, excite, and further develop life skills.

Winners

Mikayla Anderson, Deposit – Del-Bros Member

Nate Dennis, Treadwell – Independent Member

Raina Howe, Walton – Country Bumpkins & Eye of the Clover Member

Alexis Pernice, Hamden – Thundering Hooves Member

Mikayla Pernice, Hamden – Thundering Hooves Member

Gregory Zuill, Davenport – Backyard Critters Member

Alternates

George Machala, Franklin – Little Clovers Member

Tracer Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

Jacob Pomeroy, Walton – Independent Member

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4-H CAPITAL DAYS TRIP to Albany

Awarded on the basis of citizenship, leadership, ability and overall achievement. The participants in this program spend two days with 4-Hers from every county in New York State meeting with senators and assemblymen, touring the Capitol, Legislative Office Building, and State Museum.

Winners

George Machala, Franklin – Little Clovers Member

Tracer Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

Alternates

Nate Dennis, Treadwell – Independent Member

Jacob Pomeroy, Walton – Independent Member

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4-H CAREER EXPLORATION TRIP to Cornell

An opportunity for youth to explore the resources of Cornell University. The three days are a chance to learn about science and technology, check out college life, and develop leadership skills through one of several special programs.

Winners

Mikayla Anderson, Deposit – Del-Bros Member

Brynne Backus, Sidney Center – Kountry Kids & Kritters Member

Matt Cox, Franklin – Independent Member

Grace Dunham, Summit – Colorful Clovers Member

Autumn Madugno, Deposit – Del-Bros Member

Cael Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

Alternates

1st Alternate: Jacob Pomeroy, Walton – Independent Member

Nate Dennis, Treadwell – Independent Member

Tracer Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

George Machala, Franklin – Little Clovers Member

Lindsey Wright, Delancey – Independent Member

Ryan Zuill, Davenport – Backyard Critters

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HONOR AWARD TRIP to NEW YORK CITY

A cultural trip and selection is based on accomplishment and achievements in 4-H.

Winners

George Machala, Franklin – Little Clovers Member

Alexis Pernice, Hamden – Thundering Hooves Member

Mikayla Pernice, Hamden – Thundering Hooves Member

Jacob Pomeroy, Walton – Independent Member

Alternate

Matt Cox, Treadwell – Independent Member

Tracer Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

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CAREER EXPLORATION TRIP to Vermont

A trip where teens will explore careers and participate in cultural experiences.

Winners

Mikayla Anderson, Deposit – Del-Bros Member

Tracer Howland, Franklin – TRAEL Pets Member

Alternate

Nate Dennis, Treadwell – Independent Member

George Machala, Franklin – Little Clovers Member

Festive Holiday Kissing Balls

Kissing balls add warmth and beauty indoors and out.  On December 2nd, CCE Delaware county hosted not one but two workshops on kissing ball creation.  Using freshly sourced local greenery, over 40 participants made gorgeous kissing balls for their homes and loved ones.  Our primary material was Norway spruce, which is abundant around here.  Once a framework was established, bits of blue spruce, pine needle clusters, and Rhododendron leaves were added.  Pine cones were added for the finishing touch.

Couldn’t make it to the workshop, but want to make a kissing ball? You can download full instructions by clicking here!

 

Packed House!

 

Executive Director Jeanne Darling demonstrates the insertion of greens into foam.

 

Works of art in progress!

 

Ta-da!  Our youngest participant shows off her gorgeous creation.

Making maple in Delaware County

Although we associate maple syrup production with the cold winter days of early spring, a great deal of education and planning takes place in the fall.

On October 21st, CCE Delaware hosted a beginning maple syrup production workshop that was sponsored by the Watershed Agriculture Council.  The workshop was led by Stephen Childs, the New York State Maple Specialist at Cornell University.  He covered a variety of aspects of maple syrup production including: why make maple syrup, tree identification, tree health, tapping, sap collection and handling, boiling, energy efficiency, finishing and grading syrup, canning, marketing and regulations.  Participants included hobbyists who had already tapped a few trees and wanted to improve quality/efficiency and landowners looking to try making syrup for the first time.

After a very informative classroom session, we visited Brookside Maple and Farm, a nearby operation that has grown by leaps and bounds over the last few years.  Brothers Matt and Micah Scobie started making syrup as as kids, and continued to add taps and increase production during their school years.  Now that they have graduated and have full-time jobs, they have actually scaled up, but are using technology to make the process more efficient.  They are using reverse osmosis to concentrate the sap prior to boiling (saves time + energy) and have invested in a large-scale oil fired evaporator.

Delaware County Maple Producers are a very knowledgeable, helpful group willing to share ideas, advice and resources.  Several members met here at the CCE office in Hamden on September 26th, and plan to meet again on November 16th at 7 p.m.  Christine Reimer from Mountain Lady Maple will discuss organic maple production, her novel packaging, and bar codes.  For more information, call the office at 607-865-6531 or email [email protected] .

 

Leaves out!

The peak of fall is behind us in Delaware County.  We were lucky to get a brief, beautiful showing Columbus day weekend, but now the hills taking on the muted tones of winter.  What happened?

We began seeing leaf drop before the fair, and signs of distress even earlier in the summer.  The cool, wet summer caused a proliferation of fungal diseases, which impacted numerous tree species.  The hardest hit by far in our county…apples.  I fielded apple calls just about every day in August and September.  It started as spots on leaves and fruit, and escalated into totally bare trees.  Some were loaded with fruit, some had no fruit, but a major theme was leaf drop.  The major culprit – apple scab disease.  This common disease affects most apples and crabapples that aren’t treated on a yearly basis, but it usually isn’t problematic.  A spot here or there doesn’t really take away from the beauty of the tree, and the apples are still tasty for humans and wildlife.

This year, the trees decided to cut their losses, and dropped their leaves. Some varieties pumped their surplus resources into fruit production, which resulted in early ripening.  Other varieties dropped their apples before they even had a chance to ripen.

Maples, our leaf-color superheros, were also affected by the damp conditions.  Tar spot, another common fungal pathogen, hit the maples hard and early this year.  Like the apples, the leaves just fell off the tree without any noteworthy color change.  Luckily, not all varieties are sensitive, and we did see some gorgeous oranges, yellows, and reds.

Delaware County is not alone.  There have been reports of early leaf drop across the Southern Tier and into the Finger Lakes.

Now here is the GOOD NEWS…the trees should be just fine as long as we don’t have multiple back-to-back years like this one.  The absolute best thing you can do this year is to rake up and dispose of your leaves.  I’m usually adamant about mulching and composting leaves, but the sick leaves need to go.  If you live in a village, put them out for curbside pickup.  In the country, either relocate the leaves to an un-used part of the property to decay naturally, or speed up the process in place by mowing over the leaves.  You can also add a dilute solution of urea as described in this article.

For next year, consider treating important ornamentals and small fruit trees with a fungicide in the early winter/late spring (see this publication for more information).